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THE GLOBS

Genre: Alternative Rock, Experimental, Rock

Website: http://www.myspace.com/theglobs

Contact:
theglobs@yahoo.com
MP3 (click name to download; click player to stream):
I Hate the 21st Century
 

The Joy of Fishes ("The Sound & The Fury", 2008)
 

MORE ABOUT THE GLOBS

The Globs are a Boston-based indie rock band formed in 2004 by singer, guitarist, and principal songwriter Jon Hutchins. Originally composed of five bored security guards at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts, the band (now a quartet) has gone through several lineup changes, most recently with the addition of bassist Linda Hutchins. Drummer Dave Erickson and guitarist/keyboardist Derek Demulling round out the group.

The Globs are known locally for their legendary stage antics and spectacles, drawing comparisons to The Tubes and P-Funk. The band's 2005 debut album, "Hatch", is a space-rock schlock-fantasy about four earthlings who become dissatisfied with their smog-drenched, dilapidated planet. Filled with numerous metaphors and plot twists, the story goes from boisterous juvenile squandering to a triumphant, even poignant, grand finale. Entirely composed in the galleries of the Museum of Fine Arts while on-duty and self-produced on a budget of $300, "Hatch" is a tour de force of the home recording revolution.

The following three years have found the band splintering into several musical directions. From brooding melodramatic dirges (2008’s “The Sound & The Fury) - to heavy freak-out walls of noise (mostly confined to the privacy of the practice space, but occasionally leaking out into live performances) - to shiny, sardonic, satirical pop gems (the forthcoming “Hit You With Your Own Fantastic”, due for completion in the summer of 2009).

The second LP by The Globs, 2008’s “The Sound & The Fury” is a slow-burning semi-concept album that explores the inner self, outer being, and strange things in between, set against the matte background of our absurd, comical, and nonsensical world. Meant to be listened to as an album, rather than merely a collection of songs, it echoes the grandeur and subtlety of the album-rock legacy pioneered by bands such as Yes, Led Zeppelin, and Pink Floyd, but with a stylistic approach all its own. A fine album to listen to on a rainy fall day, if you don’t mind being a little depressed.